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Can Someone Go To Jail In Victoria For Threatening To Kill You?

Can Someone Go To Jail In Victoria For Threatening To Kill You?

Based on the Crimes Act 1958, someone can go to jail for threatening to kill another person. That threat must either be made with the intention that someone else would believe it or is reckless regarding whether the other person would fear the threat would be carried out. In other words, the threat must be

What Is The Age Of Consent In Victoria?

What Is The Age Of Consent In Victoria?

The law in Victoria sets clear age limits for when you can legally have sex. This is called the age of consent. A person can be charged with a sexual offence if they perform a sexual act that breaks these age limits, even if the younger person agrees. In Victoria, a person aged 16 years

Can A Lawyer Refuse A Client?

Can A Lawyer Refuse A Client? (Victoria)

Ever wondered if a lawyer is allowed to refuse a client in the state of Victoria? The short answer is “yes”, lawyers can decline to work with a prospective client based on several factors such as ethical reasons, case complexity, time restrictions, conflict of interest and financial considerations. Not every lawyer-client pairing is a good

What’s The Difference Between A Lawyer And A Barrister?

What’s The Difference Between A Lawyer And A Barrister? (Australia)

In Victoria, as well as Australia as a whole the legal profession boasts a wide array of roles, some of which are just different names for the same thing, while others are completely distinct. There are two main types of lawyers in Australia: Solicitors and Barristers. The main difference between a solicitor and a barrister

Is Breaching A Court Order A Criminal Offense?

Is Breaching A Court Order A Criminal Offense? (Australia)

A court order is any order issued by the court that sets out someone’s rights and responsibilities under the law. Courts use orders to administer justice across virtually every type of case, from civil law to criminal proceedings. Court orders are treated as law—which means that violating a court order is a violation of the